Christian & Jewish Terrorism: Sept 1982


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Massacre_of_palestinians_in_shatila.jpg
Massacre of Palestinians in Shatila

Image Source: Wikipedia

This September of 2010 is the 28th anniversary of the Sabra and Shatila Massacres of Palestinian refugees in Beirut, Lebanon. Christian militias with israeli support slaughtered thousands of innocent men, women & children including babies in cold blood. Robert Fisk estimated the total to be 1700 to 2000. Robert Fisk in his book “Pity the Nation” gives an account of the horrors of the massacre. See excerpt @ Sabra and Shatila by Robert Fisk

Some quotes from above,

It went beyond even what the Israelis would have in other circumstances called a terrorist activity. It was a war crime.

We might have accepted evidence of a few murders; even dozens of bodies, killed in the heat of combat. Bur there were women lying in houses with their skirts torn torn up to their waists and their legs wide apart, children with their throats cut, rows of young men shot in the back after being lined up at an execution wall. There were babies – blackened babies babies because they had been slaughtered more than 24-hours earlier and their small bodies were already in a state of decomposition – tossed into rubbish heaps alongside discarded US army ration tins, Israeli army equipment and empty bottles of whiskey.

Another child lay on the roadway like a discarded doll, her white dress stained with mud and dust. She could have been no more than three years old. The back of her head had been blown away by a bullet fired into her brain. One of the women also held a tiny baby to her body. The bullet that had passed into her breast had killed the baby too. Someone had slit open the woman’s stomach, cutting sideways and then upwards, perhaps trying to kill her unborn child. Her eyes were wide open, her dark face frozen in horror.

When does a killing become an outrage? When does an atrocity become a massacre? Or, put another way, how many killings make a massacre? Thirty? A hundred? Three hundred? When is a massacre not a massacre? When the figures are too low? Or when the massacre is carried out by Israel’s friends rather than Israel’s enemies?

That, I suspected, was what this argument was about. If Syrian troops had crossed into Israel, surrounded a Kibbutz and allowed their Palestinian allies to slaughter the Jewish inhabitants, no Western news agency would waste its time afterwards arguing about whether or not it should be called a massacre.

But in Beirut, the victims were Palestinians. The guilty were certainly Christian militiamen – from which particular unit we were still unsure – but the Israelis were also guilty.

May the martyrs of this genocide be granted higher and higher stations in Paradise. The world may forget, but GOD knows ALL.

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